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I have broken down the rules in such a way that, in my opinion, they make sense, are easy to understand, have a great scope in their application and can be memorized. Adjetivos relacionales has no levels of intensity or degrees. An Australian boy cannot be « very Australian » (at least not in the literal sense). A good test of whether an adjective belongs to this group is to see if you can put « very » in front of it. For example, una mesa muy rectangular (a very rectangular table) makes no sense, so is rectangular in this group. Although una mesa muy roja is possible – a red table « more intense » than another – this means that the roja is not an adjetivo relacional. Singular Spanish adjectives always end in -z, -r, l, -e or -o/-a. By far the most common Spanish adjective extension is the -o/-a variety. It ends in its masculine form on -o and in its feminine form on -a. Sometimes the order is authenticated by the noun, sometimes by the adjective, sometimes by the context and sometimes by convention.

Some Spanish adjectives used to describe male and female nouns are: Amable (type), Difícil (difficult), Fácil (easy), Flexible, Paciente (patient), Verde (green). Also, most numbers change, except for number one, which changes in UN when used before a male noun, and in UNA before a female noun, e.B. « Un amigo » and « Una amiga » So let`s talk about the rules, then practice with Clozemaster, yes? Exception: For adjectives that end in z in the singular, replace the z with a c before adding the plural extension. For adjectives ending in a consonant, you need to add « it »: for example, the noun las faldas (skirts) is plural and feminine, so all adjectives used to describe it are usually also plural and feminine. These adjectives have four forms. .

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